Techno: David Veiga – Tocandira

For his debut solo release on VaiVem Records, we are glad to welcome David Veiga. Bringing us two great tracks, “Tocandira” which signs the release delivering a somewhat melodic feeling, yet performing an intense approach by vocals and synths translating a dark and noisy encircle.

Tocandira is a track by David Veiga, from VaiVem Records, a techno collective from Northeast Brazil.

 

Electronic: LPascolatti – Rotterdam’s Forgotten Tales

Two unreleased tracks from LPascolatti produced in Spiderhuis Studio when he was based in Rotterdam during the autumn, winter and spring of 2017/2018. Both tracks combine digital and analogue synthesizers with emulated orchestral instruments, with a final result resembling cinematic classical compositions.

Check Capiroto Record’s new release.

Electronica: Semper Volt – Babiloving

Muito grudado, muito tudo junto
Interligados pelo nosso culto
Indubitavelmente mundo fútil
Dentro passado fora passo curto

Passar o dedo pelo cabelo dela
Ele queria aaa
E pendurava a calcinha na janela
Ela que ria aaa

Babiloving is the new track from São Paulo based producer Semper Volt, feature here in the blog before with Leve. According to João Tenório (Semper Volt), the track started as a hip hop beat that evolved after having some vocals added to it, with some more jazzy influences. The track was written in a blues scale, being inspired by many contemporary Brazilian artists, such as Céu or Nação Zumbi.

The track has been added to our Spotify playlist Synths of Eden:

Nu Jazz: Pablo Zuazo – Macaco Nu Jazz

His North Star is the notion that “Modernity is Tradition”: the point is neither the past nor the future, but their interrelationship, as Modern and Tradition merge in the present moment, here and now.

Pablo Zuazo is an artist from São Paulo, Brazil, that produces nu jazz. Plus, being a singer and songwriter. His influences shift from Bossa Nova, to MPB, Samba, Jazz, Hip Hop and Electronica. All those influences are clear while listening his songs.  Macaco Nu Jazz has been released in 2017, blending jazzy keys, gospel vocals a nice rhythm. A perfect mood for a night time walk or for a morning coffee.

You can check Pablo’s Spotify for more, Macaco Nu Jazz has been added to our Chilling in Eden playlist:

Synthwave in Eden – Interview: Cleeve Morris – Psychological

The only Synthwave producer from São Paulo I ever came to know (which by the way is my home town) Cleeve Morris, artist name for João Carlos, has been highly productive, with a new release almost every single month. Besides being very engaged in building a community in Twitter and with his own Synthwave website called Synthwave Club reaching up to 4500 tracks according to him, representing more than 350 hours of music collected. All of that shows how much effort João Carlos invests on his music and on the Synthwave scene. Currently he is releasing a lot of new content every month. Such as his EP Psychological, self-released this past 14th September on Bandcamp (as embedded).

We have interviewed João Carlos to get to know more about him, his story as a Synthwave producer and asked him a few questions about the Synthwave scene in South America, specially in Brazil.

Present us yourself, where do you come from? What is your story as a music fan and as an artist, when did you first start make your own music? What motivated you? What were the first instruments you started to play and when. How did you come out to be the artist Cleeve Morris?


My name is João Carlos Alves, 35 years old, and I’m from São Paulo, Brazil, where I live and work. Also, I’m married, with a six years old daughter. Currently, I work as a Web Designer and Developer. I remember music since was I 4 years old, when sometimes I tried to listen children’s music, but my aunt was always suggesting me to listen some other things like: Information Society, a-ha, Alphaville…

My uncles have a big responsibility on an important part of my music taste. With my uncles I listened several different things (or styles) such as: Europe, Air Supply, Malmsteen, Whitesnake, Queen, Elton John, Van Halen, Saxon, Rainbow, Dio, Stratovarius and more…
My father always taught me how to love psychedelic and progressive rock like Pink Floyd, Yes, Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Jethro Tull… some good things that inspire me to do my own music are my triad: Vangelis, Kraftwerk and Jean-Michel Jarre. Pink Floyd was probably the first thing I ever heard in my life, no joke. With my mom and grandparents, I listened a lot of Brazilian music.

I really waited a long time to start working with music. I used to play with a few friends in the past, but for some reasons I left behind any possibility of working with music. I was stuck with listening to a single genre for a long time until I could realise how stupid it is… Now I’m also studying music theory.

I first started with acoustic guitar, shifting to electric, electric bass and experimented with drums for a while. However, I still plan to improve my keyboard skills. I used to sing as well, but a long time ago. Please, don’t expect me to sing on my own tracks at this moment! Nowadays, I use midi controller keyboards plugged into my DAWs (Digital Audio Workstation) and the guitar to help with the melody.

I started the Cleeve Morris project in 2013 with a friend that was procuding Vaporwave with me, as much as all the digital artistic concepts surrounding it. We fulfilled some goals without any kind of plans. And this was our gateway drug.

One night at work while listening to Vaporwave, I discovered in a playlist, artists like: Com Truise, Future Holotape, Cobra Strike Force. In that same night, my adrenaline was too high because I couldn’t stop listening that new genre called Synthwave. Months later I started the Cleeve Morris “solo adventure in the Synth world”.

Why the artist name Cleeve Morris? Is there a specific story behind it?

A colleague from work who used to smok weed hidden from his parents called it “Cousin Morris” (a Philip Morris lost cousin). While he shared it with me, I created the name Cleeve as we laughed about that story (though we didn’t smoke “Uncle Morris” that day). Stupid, not a funny joke, I reckon, but while I was developing an artist name, that story fitted perfectly with what I looked for as an artist name.

Tell us about the Synthwave scene in São Paulo, Brazil and South America.

Synthwave in Brazil is getting bigger, but only as an online community. Sad but true. There are some parties happening here and there. They are all organised by DIY artists trying do what I tried here in São Paulo some time ago.

I attempted to throw a Synthwave party here (I was preparing myself and the public to receive Kalax (atist from Liverpool). We were close to doing this… but at this moment, sorry, probably would never happen. After months promoting the event, only 5 people have shown up. We were waiting, and waiting… in the end, we stopped the music and started to drink and smoke on the roof. A total failure. I don’t have this dream anymore. But I hope someday, someone else can try something different.

About Brazilian artists, there is a bunch of good people out there making Synthwave. Good names, I have recently listened are: New Black, Alseph, Francci and I specially Miami Cruiser 1984, who does an amazing artwork. We started to talk about a project telling a story together, music and design.

In South America we have a lot of good artists like Meteor, Ozimov, Cristian Bergagna, Steamboy…
I believe Brazil, Argentina and Colombia, are the leading countries on this scene here in the South America. They are really good artists and people!

How do you produce your music? It seems like 2017 and 2018 have been very productive for Cleeve Morris.

I use FL Studio, LMMS, Caustic 3 and Audacity with a simple audio interface and MIDI Controller.

I experienced a lot of personal obstacles during 2015 and 2016 and every single track I did by that time became automatically unreleased. After all of that turbulence calmed down, I realized at least I had some good content created, mostly not finished or not mastered, so I decided to collect all that material and release whatever I could. Not everything is of a good audio quality, but for sure there are plenty of good compositions within all of that. And of course I’m still producing new things constantly.

What do you think of music made by synthesizers in the contemporary time and what do you think about the influence of technology in the way we current listen and make music? Is there an interesting criticism you’d like to make? Overall, is it just an internet trend of late capitalism or it’s a genre coming from the 60s that opens the doors to many possibilities when it comes to music making?

Music is the best thing created on this world. No matter if was electronic or analog, or a simple kid playing some rusty metal on a poor village.

Music frees. Music heals. Music makes you cry and laugh. After creating my simple songs, my life changed forever, and I can’t see myself doing something else, even if it’s just a personal hobby. As a web developer too, I can say, the social media and some stream platforms are kidding with the users. If you don’t pay, believe me, max. 5% of your public will reach your content.

The more we use and share our things there, more people we can attract, but this is only a dream today. Show your money and everything will be fine or at least it seems to be…
I spent some money on Facebook recently, and had zero new likes. Well…

Is there something else you’d like to say about your music? Other works you do, free space to market your stuff. (such as your own website/radio)

I will keep composing more music, not only Synthwave or 80’s based sound. Of course, this will continue as the main Cleeve Morris style, but prepare to listen some random music sometimes.

Side by side with Cleeve Morris, I do a job with Synthwave Club, a simple web player I created and now there is more than 5000 Synth/Retrowave tracks there. I use the SoundCloud API to get all that information. It helps sharing a lot of new artists.

Now I’m doing layouts and coding the new Synthwave Club website, and I can say: it will be amazing!

If I can do everything I wanna do, we will probably have a good (probably the coolest) website to see good content and listen our beloved Synthwave (and other subgenres). I can’t say more now because it’s still a work in progress with a lot of things still undone. So, everything can change.

I wanna say a big thanks to have been invited to this awesome interview. Also I wanna invite Synths of Eden to publish and share any content of on Synthwave Club in the future. I hope everyone will give me a chance on their Spotify playlists.

You can find me here:
Spotify: www.play.spotify.com/artist/61D22Ez4c3MeQ4316ivMtN
Twitter: www.twitter.com/cleevemorris
Bandcamp: www.cleevemorris.bandcamp.com
Site: www.cleevemorris.com

Thanks for your time reading this!

….

You can listen Cleeve Morris and his track Tristitia in our Spotify playlist Synthwave in Eden:

Trip-Rock: Escape Into – Ancient Language

Escape Into is a duo from Rio de Janeiro, formed by Dan Flict and Werther Azevedo. They started out in 2012 releasing their first album The Dream, followed one year later by their second album The Drama.

In 2018 the duo is back with The Mirror, their most adventurous release so far, this one not sticking to any specific genre, being classified by them as a blend of freestyle electronic music with strong progressive influences, specially from psychedelic and prog rock. This blend is called by them “trip-rock”.

The album is composed by 6 tracks, being Ancient Language the first one, followed by the highly melodic Purpose, a 7 minute track, together with fast tempo Another World the longest tracks from The Mirror. It is possible to listen that the duo is also highly influenced by the genres Metal, Goa and Psychedelic Trance.

The Mirror was mastered by Colin Bennun and the artwork created by Carol Porto.

It is also available for purchase in Bandcamp.

The track has been featured in our Spotify Playlist Synths of Eden:

DJ Mix: Barchi at @Trackers – Techno Garden 12|05|18 SP

Trackers has been one of the best night clubs from São Paulo’s underground scene, great bands, great electronic music. There is no mistake if you are around São Paulo and want to enjoy great Live PAs and DJ sets, in the great atmosphere of Brazil’s biggest metropolis old city centre. With a guaranteed  sunrise from its balcony’s full of junkies.

Barchi, that has released tracks such as Thugh Night and Take Smooth with Capiroto Records has uploaded this techno mix performed in Tracker’s at 12th May, 2018. It’s one hour of great techno tracks, including:

Barchi – Jungle Demon
Dashdot – June
Barchi – Take Smooth
Animal Picnic – Ethorica
Barchi & Shampo – Thug Night
Worakls – Toi
Jonas Rathsman feat. Josef Salvat – Complex (Serge Devant Remix)
Aaryon & Ran Salman – Riptide (Philipp Kempnich)Remix)
Olivier Giacomoto – Bipolar Star (Victor Ruiz Remix)
Victor Ruiz & Drunken Kong – Inside Out
Acid Pauli & Monolink – New Morning

Enjoy!

New Release: Capiroto Records/LPascolatti – Prologue of an Insane World

They can kill a rose or two
Spring will come
Again…

The track was released last week by Capiroto Records. It is the last track composed by LPascolatti in his former Spiderhuis Studio in Rotterdam. The track mixes music composition in F#Minor together with lyrics inspired in the current misfortunes of global economic crisis and contemporary representative democracies, specially in his home-country Brazil.

The idea was to mix digital, organic and analogue synthesizers in a short-track that would express all the desolate feelings of “an insane world” we’ve been living in.

Art by Olga Sergeeva.

LPascolatti is an artist from São Paulo, Brazil, based in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Besides producing his own music, managing and releasing it by Capiroto Records, he is also editor of this blog Synths of Eden.

LPascolatti’s first album Born to Die has been re-delivered to digital streaming platforms after one year of its official release in May 2017, you can stream it once again in Spotify.

Psychedelic-Rock: BIKE – Their Shamanic Majesties’ Third Request

Rompe-ferro, Rompe-nuvem, Beira-Mar
Rompe-aço, Rompe-fogo, Beija o Ar
Serra Azul, Mata Virgem, Encruzilhada
7 ondas, 7 caminhos, 7 matas

(Cavalo)

I have been listening Bike since 2015, the year they released their first album, indeed a very lysergic year for myself back in São Paulo, apparently also for many people in Brazil, doce was everywhere. Their first album 1943 changed my view on contemporary Brazilian psychedelic rock, that followed bands I have been watching for a long time, such as Boogarins. Bike, from São Paulo, always brings the true psychedelic influences to their music, with clear references to LSD and psilocybin, to start by their name itself. A band I still didn’t have the opportunity to watch alive (though they are certainly coming back to Europe). They are celebrating three years on the read, including an European tour. Bike is active not only alive but specially in the studio.

Last year, their second album Em Busca da Viagem Eterna (Searching for the endless trip) came to me as a surprise, following their 1943 in style, I made sure to add one of its tracks to Synths of Eden playlist Brasil Progressivo (below). Now, Bike is featured with their newest work Their Shamanic Majesties’ Third Request and their track Ingá. First place of our playlist. The typical sound marked by reverberated vocals and guitars full of effects. Followed by trippy lyrics, this time brings back Brazilian rural tradition, including organic instruments and other types of teas and plants. Two other important features in the album, Bonifrate in Ingá, plus Tagore in Cavalo.

In total 8 tracks. The album’s title is a clear reference to The Rolling Stones, with Their Satanic Majesties Request and Brian Jonestown Massacre ,”Their Satanic Majesties’ Second Request” (1996).

You can order the vinyl copy in their official website, as much as check the dates to watch them alive in Brazil and later on in Europe. The album was recorded and mixed in Estúdio Wasabi by Diego Xavier. Mastered by Rob Grant in Poons Head Studio – Perth, Austrália. Art by Juli Ribeiro.

Bike is:

Julito – vocals, electric and acoustic guitar.
Diego Xavier – vocals, electric guitar and viola.
João Gouvea – vocals, bass and viola.
Daniel Fumega – Drums and percurssion
Brenno Balbino – Synthesizers
Pedro Bonifrate – vocal in Ingá
Tagore Suassuna – vocal in Cavalo

Divagation & Lo-Fi/IDM: Vacilant – Só me faça esquecer das coisas (2018)

Há, desde a origem do que chamamos de mundo, a tentativa do homem de não se fazer esquecer, o medo inerente do desaparecimento. A memória como refúgio, o desejo de fazer de perpetuar as sensações, o sentido, a procura do que escapa. “Só me faça esquecer das coisas” se encontra no entre a tentativa de permanência através da memória e da pulsação do desejo de esquecer.

There is, since the origin of what we call world, the attempt of men and women not to be forgotten, the inherent fear of disappearing. The memory as a shelter, the desire to perpetuate the feelings, the senses, the search for escapism. ‘Só me faça esquecer das coisas’ (only make me forget the things), is found in between the attempt to be present through memory and the pulsation of a desire to forget.

Vacilant – Só me faça esquecer das coisas

Today Synths of Eden has the pleasure to feature Vacilant, artist from Forteleza, Ceará.

His album Só me faça esquecer das coisas, with the link in Bandcamp embedded, has been released by Mercúrio Música, label also based in Fortaleza. The whole album itself is great, with 11 tracks in total, mixing audio samples in English and Portuguese with organic and synthesized sounds and instruments. The whole album has been composed by Yuri Costa, mixed and mastered. Though it had the participation of Felipe Couto in the guitars, Clau Anis in the clarinets, plus Junior Quintela in the percussion. Tracks are kind of short, with an average of 3 minutes each. It is Yuri’s second album, after Dissonia, released in 2014.

The 11 tracks are a big voyage through electronic music, mixed with rock influences and lo-fi beat-making. My favourite one is Tecnologias não me ajudam.

It is also possible to stream the album in Spotify. For sure it will be featured in our playlist Synths of Eden this week.

Divagation – Sharing Independent Brazilian Music

As a Brazilian I know pretty well how my country can sometimes be a big enclosed island and it is not itself the most open to the international world, with several great exceptions of course. What is not necessarily wrong, as I strongly disagree with the idea that everybody should know English to have an “international” insertion. I believe in a multi-cultural world and multi-lingualism. So this blog will not be focused on the English speaking world, we want to share artists from whatever country it may be.

What I learned is that Brazil can be a big hub for creative artists that can stay away and unknown for the international English speaking world. They keep hidden in that local Portuguese speaking environment, that revolves around the use of Facebook, regional concerts and parties.Naturally in a country that lacks democracy of means of communication and people have to struggle every day for the most basic rights, making local artists known across the borders is not easy at all.

So when I created this blog I also thought it would be a nice space to share independent Brazilian music to those who read and write in English. I have been living in the Netherlands, I have a master in global communication in this language, so why not? Let’s unite my best knowledge in the Brazilian world and apply it to my knowledge in international communication with this blog.

You can check my playlist Brasil Progressivo here, for the best Brazilian progressive rock and some influences here.